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Theory of Fun

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What's it about?

What students say about this course

  • “I found this to be a quite intense course. A lot of information, and I really mean a LOT. (…) The course caused a lot of light bulb flashes and more questions. It’s a course I’d like to recommend to everyone, even when you don’t have any interest in clickertraining at all.”
  • “I love the fun delivery of the information, and also how easily behaviours can be altered by altering the approach to them.”
  • “Looove it so far :))) I have used & studied conditioning for the last 10 years more or less, but always felt that some things just didn’t add up… So far this makes a lot of sense to me & helps me tie a few loose strings together.”
  • “Well Inge, your course has made a HUGE impact.  I have followed it like I would read a favourite novel – every spare moment I can grab I have been glued to the screen – your game plan  has worked to motivate me and I don’t want the course to end! There have been too many lightbulb moments to mention.”

How this course happened into existence

It took me a while before I could get myself to try clickertraining. Not in the least because I found the theory behind it so hard to understand. And then of course all those prejudices I had. But I did hang on, worked through the hazards, and my world changed.
Ever since then, the science behind the practical work started fascinating me. I finally fully understood that weird learning quadrant of operant conditioning while working through a whole lot of clickertrained exercizes with all kinds of horses. I thought I got it. From now on, everything would just work.
But of course, it didn’t.
I already knew a lot about the ethology of the wild horse, and had delved into stuff like biomechanics. Meanwhile I discovered that a thing like classical conditioning was a lot more than what even renowned clickertraining instructors had told me. I started understanding the difference between habituation and habits, and the importance of social learning. I thoroughly worked at an in-depth understanding of loops, chains and green light-cues… . That led to the ‘Denkwerk’-book.
The book didn’t have enough pages though. With all its 377 pages, it still is a very limited introduction to learning and motivation. There is so much more happening in the heads of our horses. If we, clickertrainers, cling on to a literal understanding of operant conditioning and 1:1 ratios (1 click = 1 reward), we will get stuck.
So here it is, the sequel to the Denkwerk book, yet in a different form: the movies, links and downloads of the “Theory of Fun” course.

Estimated workload

This course contains 15+ hours of movie lessons, plus additional readings, viewings and assignments. Gaming is hard work!
You maybe think you can binge-watch it, but I bet you won’t make it all the way through. It’s just way too much info and your brain is guaranteed to sizzle and fry within the first half hour. Most people need… 3 to 4 months.

Oh yea: the course is a living, breathing thing. It’ll grow. More will be added. Fortunately, you’ll never lose access once you paid.

ChapterTopicDescription
1Hello!Some practicalities at the start of the course
2Your horse, you, and the Red QueenIntroduction
3The unicorn and the clickertrainerThis first actual learning chapter is not about horses, but about how we, humans, look at ourselves and at others, and about how we form our opinions. Our brains are our guardian angels, but when it comes to forming opinions, they are super-conservative and actually quite lazy. They'll do everything to prevent you from changing your mind. It's good to understand where your beliefs come from!
4Motivation theories, death traps and conundrumsIn this chapter the serious horse fun starts! Or at least... the squeaking in your brain, because animal ethics isn't exactly the easiest topic.
Lots of background info in this one: a follow-up on some actual criticism that - eek! - might be right. How do we deal with our horses if we look at it from a strictly ethical point of view? We look at the viewpoints of Tom Regan and Peter Singer, two wellknown contemporary fighters for animal rights. We discover an ethical viewpoint where we as horse trainers may identify most with: the capabilities approach from Martha Nussbaum.
5Control, control, my kingdom for control! What’s the difference between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, does it even exist, and if so, is extrinsic motivation really that bad?
To answer that, we dive into the self determination theory from Ed Deci and Richard Ryan, but first we have a look at some important core definitions from the history of motivational psychology, which still are very important.
Eventually we can make a list of the ways in which intrinsic and extrinsic motivation work with, or against each other.
6Black bile and carrotsIn this chapter we look at personality theories. If we want to train our horse, and make custom games for him, we should know who he really is. Can we really know who our horse is? Can we copy-paste human personality traits upon our horses? Does the combination - or clash - between our and his personality influence what we can get from him?
7It's all fun and games until someone loses an eyeWhy would we turn to games to train horses? Well, that depends on how you look at games, or at training.
We'll have a look at the similarities and differences between play and games, with a few basic concepts like voluntariness, rules and the 'magic circle' - things we should remember when we go look in more detail at horse fun and horse play further on.
8What is that, this fun, and can my horse eat it?To know how we can bring more fun into our training, we should know more about what fun actually is. How does fun work exactly? Is it an emotion apart?
How does it work in the brain? What are the properties of fun?
We'll have a look at intensity and emotional values, and the short and the long routes in the brain. We'll talk about some of the most important happy hormones: the neurotransmitters that are about different kinds of fun.
We'll also look at two large components of fun: wanting versus liking and why, because of this, some horses get all hyper, and other horses don't want anything at all.
We'll also ponder an important question:  if we want our horse to have fun, will he feel like he's having fun?
9Horse playA 'light' chapter, but an important one. This is all about horseplay. What, when, how do horses play?
This chapter at least has plenty of horse movies!
10Let's sneak into Panksepp's home and move the furnitureAfter the what, when, how of play-questions from the previous chapter, now the big question: why do we play - horses, as well as humans?
If you had any doubt on the importance of play and game design, this chapter is bound to wash away any shred of doubt. Play is really, really important in many surprising ways. Play makes smart animals even smarter. Social behavior, stress calibration, moral behavior, creativity and becoming smarter through evolution, it's all because of... play.
11The brain as a playful learning junkieThe brain loves to learn new things... but what happens after it figured out how it works? Then it gets bored. The brain is made for challenges and thrives in possibility space.
12The paradox of choiceBeing able to choose seems the highest possible freedom. But is that really so, and do our horses agree?
Can we really implement choice setups in horse training, and increase our horse's feeling of autonomy and thus fun?
If so, how can you go about it that they choose what we'd like them to choose? A few ideas.
13FlowThis short but important chapter brings us the concept of 'flow', or at least its interpretation for games and training. Flow is an essential concept for understanding fun during learning. Flow happens when everything goes right: it's not too hard, and not too easy. How do game designers move between boredom and frustration, and how do they build skill within that flow 'corridor'?
After this chapter it won't surprise you that the properties of flow come back in every good long term training plan.
14ScaffoldingThis chapter brings what may be the most important, but hardest to grasp concept of this course: scaffolding. Learning doesn't go straight up in a smooth, easy line. Learning goes everywhere: forward, backwards, left, right, slow and fast... in arousal arcs, attention spans, learning curves, and, yes, loops. You will recognize them in how your horse learns. And of course: if that's how learning goes, you should find them back in your training plans.
This is not an easy chapter, but the implications will grow on you. You can do it!
15Boss encountersA light chapter, yet something to consider. If you really 'grokked' the last chapters on scaffolding, arcs and loops, then you know that each big learning arc ends with a consolidation- and recovery faze, before we can go to the next zone. One of the ways to make sure your horse is ready for the next zone, is to test him. In a game, game designers would send an enormous dragon towards you. What would be a suitable dragon for you and your horse in your training plan?
16The power of uncertaintiesSome major brain work this week!
Surely you learned that a fixed 1:1 ratio (one behavior = one click = one treat) is the only way to go. Is that really so? Turns out our good ol' 1:1 fixed ratio can stay to begin with, but not to maintain or finish behaviors. We quickly repeat the basic reinforcement schedules, delve into how that fits with nature, fun, arcs and loops, and then apply it all to one training session.
After this week you're guaranteed to start rewarding differently... and less. Remember the concepts from this chapter for the upcoming habits chapter.
17FeedbackFeedback has many meanings. Some you know already.
One of the strongest tools in game design is constant feedback, about progress, but also about mistakes - and leaving it up to the player (your horse) to do something with that. That feedback comes in loops.
This chapter you see why truely grokking loops is so important. Positive and negative feedback loops are an alternative way to look at operant conditioning, because they actually are looping learning processes in the brain.

Take the concepts from this chapter into the one on attitudes later on.
18TribesFeedback is always a social event, and the feedback chapter flows into this Tribes-chapter. A short chapter, to tie together some loose ends from previous chapters, and some musings on using other horses as co-trainers.
19Shaping habitsDo you get that feeling sometimes that you'll never be able to quit with those treats, and that while your horse looks like he's getting bored more and more? That is because you are stuck in operant conditioning, while you should have transitioned into habit formation. And that simply works differently.
20Shaping attitudesThere are those horses that would do anything for you, and others have this "no way, I can't and I won't do that" attitude. Where does that difference in learning attitude come from? Sure personality is a small part of it, but most of it is learned.
On fixed versus growth mindsets, and surfing the waves.
Dig up your 10 exercizes-list: you're going to use it to start thinking long-term with them.
21Shaping performanceWhat happens if we need to get things from our horses that they may not voluntarily give us - like cooperation, grit, and hard physical work, things that horses have no purpose for, at least not within our magic circle? What can we do to lessen the impact of our taking control and them losing big chunks of autonomy - and thus fun?
22World of HorseCraftThe course is all over!
We end the class with some thoughts on where to go with all of this, and an invitation to plan and evaluate.

Follow-up

There’s a closed facebook group available for online discussions or questions about this course. You’re free to join it, but only if you’re actually following the course and are putting the effort in it  to grasp the concepts. The group also serves as an extention of the course, with links to new articles and movies that are about the topics of the course. Since science research happens every day, this course needs this regularly added info.
Somewhere in 2019, a closed, invite-only forum will magically happenstance on this very site, where we’ll explore practical training based on the contents of this course. It’ll only be open for positive-minded, friendly people who want to put the effort in of being as courteous and kind to their fellow humans as they want to be to their horses. The moderator will be a true meanie who’ll kick out anyone who isn’t behaving angelically. There’s a test-version of that forum running right now somewhere else in cyberspace, but the actual thing is not here for you too just yet.

Come prepared

Find a game you like. Or games. Any will do. It could be a tabletop game, but maybe try an mmo (the gaming techniques we’ll learn from are most clearly applied in games like World of Warcraft or GuildWars2) or any other online game, or some silly Facebook game… Play it! – and observe yourself (but not too much: enjoy the experience first).
Don’t like games? Think about why that is. Now imagine your horse and his uneasiness with the games you want to play with him. If you can’t pinpoint the why, this course will make it more clear.

Pre-knowledge

Although there will be many references to clickertraining (starting point and end conclusion are formulated towards clickertrainers), this isn’t a course about clickertraining, but rather about ethics, play, and the impact of motivational theories on learning and training.

This is not a beginners course. An understanding of different learning procedures (operant conditioning, classical conditioning, social learning, cognitive ethology, habituation) will make the impact of the course topics more clear. If not, you may struggle a bit with some topics where you need to have some background.
You don’t have to be an expert, but if you just started clickertraining and you don’t have any clue about what the operant quadrant is, just focus on that for a while. You’re not ready yet for the depth of this course.
If you’re not a clickertrainer, but you have a good understanding about the basic science of what you’re doing, then this course is for you as well. Not only will you get more understanding of what you are doing (and why it does or doesn’t work), you’ll also get to understand more about why and how clickertrainers clickertrain (or at least, how they should be training).

Did you see the Equine Clicker Conference lecture (either during the 2013 Conference or at Connection Training)? Then you have had an introduction to some of the topics of the lecture. Some of the materials will be the same as in the lecture, but all the ideas which were presented there, are expanded on in this course, nuanced, put into context, and explained in more detail.

Clickerbadges, course badges, certificate

The content of this course is compulsory knowledge for the clickerminded 3 badge. You don’t have to follow this course, but you do have to take a test about the topics in this course.
This course itself does not offer a course badge or certificate.

How to get this thing going

  1. Scroll back up and click on the big yellow button that says “enroll in this course”
  2. Buy the course.
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  5. The content of this course is now visible.

Some browsers (looking at you especially, Explorer!) don’t always cooperate with this system without a silly struggle. In that case you have to wait a while until your purchase has been manually confirmed as ‘completed’. You’ll get a mail that says so. It may take a while, because someone has to read the mail this website sends automatically, and actually respond. Once you got that mail, come back, log in, and tadaa!

Starting date
You are free to start or come back at any time you want. Just log in. Your access will never end.

Theory of Fun, the course

1. Welcome to Theory of Fun
Hello!
5M Lecture
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2. Why this course?
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3. The unicorn and the clickertrainer
Intro
15M Video
We start really easy! The first group of topics gets you used to the course format. These chapters’ lesson units are very short. The lesson movies will get split up a lot less as the course proceeds, and by the end of the course the lesson units will take up to 20 or even 30 minutes.

This first actual learning chapter is not about horses, but about how we, humans, look at ourselves and at others, and about how we form our opinions. Our brains are our guardian angels, but when it comes to forming opinions, they are super-conservative and actually quite lazy. They’ll do everything to prevent you from changing your mind. It’s good to understand where your beliefs come from!

The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
4. Motivation theories, death traps and conundrums
Intro
1M Lecture
In this chapter the serious horse fun starts! Or at least… the squeaking in your brain, because animal ethics isn’t exactly the easiest topic.
Lots of background info in this one: a follow-up on some actual criticism that – eek! – might be right. How do we deal with our horses if we look at it from a strictly ethical point of view? We look at the viewpoints of Tom Regan and Peter Singer, two wellknown contemporary fighters for animal rights. We discover an ethical viewpoint where we as horse trainers may identify most with: the capabilities approach from Martha Nussbaum.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
Schrute bucks
12M Video
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
5. Control! Control! My kingdom for control!
Intro
1M Lecture
What’s the difference between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and is extrinsic motivation really that bad?
To answer that, we dive into the self determination theory from Ed Deci and Richard Ryan, but first we have a look at some important core definitions from the history of motivational psychology, which still are very important.
Eventually we can make a list of the ways in which intrinsic and extrinsic motivation work with, or against each other.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
6. Black bile and carrots: personality theories
Intro
1M Lecture
In this chapter we look at personality theories. If we want to train our horse, and make custom games for him, we should know who he really is. Can we really know who our horse is? Can we copy-paste human personality traits upon our horses? Does the combination – or clash – between our and his personality influence what we can get from him?
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
7. It's all fun and games until someone loses an eye
Intro
1M Lecture
Why would we turn to games to train horses? Well, that depends on how you look at games, or at training.
We’ll have a look at the similarities and differences between play and games, with a few basic concepts like voluntariness, rules and the ‘magic circle’ – things we should remember when we go look in more detail at horse fun and horse play further on.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The Unicorn Game
15M Activity
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Serious games
2H Lecture
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The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
8. What is that, this fun, and can my horse have it?
Intro
1M Lecture
To know how we can bring more fun into our training, we should know more about what fun actually is. How does fun work exactly? Is it an emotion apart?
How does it work in the brain? What are the properties of fun?
We’ll have a look at intensity and emotional values, and the short and the long routes in the brain. We’ll talk about some of the most important happy hormones: the neurotransmitters that are about different kinds of fun.
We’ll also look at two large components of fun: wanting versus liking and why, because of this, some horses get all hyper, and other horses don’t want anything at all.
We’ll also ponder an important question:  if we want our horse to have fun, will he feel like he’s having fun?
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
9. Horse play
Intro
1M Lecture
A ‘light’ chapter, but an important one. This is all about horseplay. What, when, how do horses play?
This chapter at least has plenty of horse movies!
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
10. Let's sneak into Panksepp's home and move the furniture
Intro
1M Lecture
After the what, when, how of play-questions from the previous chapter, now the big question: why do we play – horses, as well as humans?
If you had any doubt on the importance of play and game design, this chapter is bound to wash away any shred of doubt. Play is really, really important in many surprising ways. Play makes smart animals even smarter. Social behavior, stress calibration, moral behavior, creativity and becoming smarter through evolution, it’s all because of… play.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
11. The brain as a playful learning junkie
Intro
1M Lecture
The brain loves to learn new things… but what happens after it figured out how it works? Then it gets bored. The brain is made for challenges and thrives in possibility space.
Where is Waldo?
10M Activity
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Finding Waldo
14M Video
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The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
12. The paradox of choice
Intro
1M Lecture
Being able to choose seems the highest possible freedom. But is that really so, and do our horses agree?
Can we really implement choice setups in horse training, and increase our horse’s feeling of autonomy and thus fun?
If so, how can you go about it that they choose what we’d like them to choose? A few ideas.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
13. Flow
Intro
1M Lecture
This short but important chapter brings us the concept of ‘flow’, or at least its interpretation for games and training. Flow is an essential concept for understanding fun during learning. Flow happens when everything goes right: it’s not too hard, and not too easy. How do game designers move between boredom and frustration, and how do they build skill within that flow ‘corridor’?
After this chapter it won’t surprise you that the properties of flow come back in every good long term training plan.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
14. Scaffolding
Intro
1M Lecture
This chapter brings what may be the most important, but hardest to grasp concept of this course: scaffolding. Learning doesn’t go straight up in a smooth, easy line. Learning goes everywhere: forward, backwards, left, right, slow and fast… in arousal arcs, attention spans, learning curves, and, yes, loops. You will recognize them in how your horse learns. And of course: if that’s how learning goes, you should find them back in your training plans.
This is not an easy chapter, but the implications will grow on you. You can do it!
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
Grokking
9M Video
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Arcs
11M Video
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Loops
18M Video
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
15. Boss encounters
Intro
1M Lecture
A light chapter, yet something to consider. If you really ‘grokked’ the last chapters on scaffolding, arcs and loops, then you know that each big learning arc ends with a consolidation- and recovery faze, before we can go to the next zone. One of the ways to make sure your horse is ready for the next zone, is to test him. In a game, game designers would send an enormous dragon towards you. What would be a suitable dragon for you and your horse in your training plan?
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
16. The power of uncertainties
Intro
1M Lecture
Some major brain work this week!
Surely you learned that a fixed 1:1 ratio (one behavior = one click = one treat) is the only way to go. Is that really so? Turns out our good ol’ 1:1 fixed ratio can stay to begin with, but not to maintain or finish behaviors. We quickly repeat the basic reinforcement schedules, delve into how that fits with nature, fun, arcs and loops, and then apply it all to one training session.
After this week you’re guaranteed to start rewarding differently… and less. Remember the concepts from this chapter for the upcoming habits chapter.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
17. Feedback
Intro
1M Lecture
Feedback has many meanings. Some you know already.
One of the strongest tools in game design is constant feedback, about progress, but also about mistakes – and leaving it up to the player (your horse) to do something with that. That feedback comes in loops.
This chapter you see why truely grokking loops is so important. Positive and negative feedback loops are an alternative way to look at operant conditioning, because they actually are looping learning processes in the brain.

Take the concepts from this chapter into the one on attitudes later on.

The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
18. Tribes
Intro
1M Lecture
Feedback is always a social event, and the feedback chapter flows into this Tribes-chapter. A short chapter, to tie together some loose ends from previous chapters, and some musings on using other horses as co-trainers.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
19. Shaping habits
Intro
1M Lecture
Do you get that feeling sometimes that you’ll never be able to quit with those treats, and that while your horse looks like he’s getting bored more and more? That is because you are stuck in operant conditioning, while you should have transitioned into habit formation. And that simply works differently.
Brain chains
25M Video
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
20. Shaping attitudes
Intro
1M Lecture
There are those horses that would do anything for you, and others have this “no way, I can’t and I won’t do that” attitude. Where does that difference in learning attitude come from? Sure personality is a small part of it, but most of it is learned.
On fixed versus growth mindsets, and surfing the waves.
Dig up your 10 exercizes-list: you’re going to use it to start thinking long-term with them.
True grit
25M Video
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
21. Shaping performance
Intro
1M Lecture
What happens if we need to get things from our horses that they may not voluntarily give us – like cooperation, grit, and hard physical work, things that horses have no purpose for, at least not within our magic circle? What can we do to lessen the impact of our taking control and them losing big chunks of autonomy – and thus fun?
Fitness games
21M Video
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
22. World of HorseCraft
Intro
1M Lecture
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The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
The content of this lesson is locked. To unlock it, you need to Buy this Course.
Duration 15 hours to 3 months
Level Intermediate
Theory of Fun How does motivation theory differ from learning theory? Why does my horse get frustrated or bored? Where do control and choice fit within training? Can my horse have fun? What is play? What is a game? And what can a horse trainer learn from a game designer?
Prijs 120.00